Flooded UXO Market

by Chris
(US)

Ive been reading and researching UXO sites. A lot of post on Facebook are saying that the market for Tech 1 jobs are hard to get because the market is being flooded by new students.


Do you feel this is correct information.

Thank you for your time.

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Jan 23, 2012
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Flooded UXO Tech I Market
by: Steve Cassidy

Thank you for the great question as I hear it in a couple of places.

The answer is yes, no and maybe.

A have close friends that are Tech I's. A lot of them.

Jason: Working solid since he graduated TEEX.

Jim: Working solid for almost 3 years. Out a couple of months with a knee injury.

James: Will only work with one of the Tetra Techs. He likes it there so he doesn't mind gaps.

Mike's 2 sons: Both solid since graduating.

Eli: Solid since graduating.

Trent: Tech 1 and now part of owner of my company, SGC Group.

Derek: Hasn't worked 1 day as a Tech. Didn't go to school to be a Tech. He's one of my guys at SGC Group.

Tye: Skips from company to company. This is OK for a while. He finally committed to a company.

Sean: Same as Tye but only likes short jobs. Doesn't get as much work as he wants. Wonder why!

All but Sean and Tye graduated TEEX and all of them work hard/smart. None of them hang out on Facebook waiting for a job to come through there.

Peggy's doing a rocking job on UXO Buddies but I think some people think that's where you go to stand in line to get work.

On Globally Employable I talk about expanding your skill set not becoming a UXO Tech and stopping there.

Just like any employer, UXO companies are looking for well-rounded candidates with a successful track record.

So coming back around my thumb to get to my elbow, the UXO Tech 1 market is flooded, if you let it be flooded.

Decide if you want to work every week of the year or just enough to make X amount of money and then stop or work for X amount of time and focus your energies on what's most important to you with the remainder.

When I'm not on the grid, I'm building my businesses and most importantly hanging out with my family. I was on the grid 7 months in 2011. Seattle, Puerto Rico, Florida and north of San Francisco.

I taught IED's to Special Forces and DEA in Yakima, WA, consulted underwater UXO in Texas. There's 3 weeks.

I taught Red Cross, learned a computer language, built 2 other websites for people, vacationed in FL twice, TN, GA.

I built another website for a joint venture I'm doing with a solar company, launched my EOD Gear website, sold another website and remodeled my kitchen.

I'm also having a great time here helping folks with tough questions about what to do next.

In closing, look at your current resume and the market you've been serving. Does your resume look like everyone else's?

Now put UXO Tech on it. When you put that on your resume, you stand out in the general or white collar market. People want to know people that do crazy things.

You can work as a UXO Tech for a while and then switch back at your will. Not because you have to.

I can't tell you to definitely do anything. Especially UXO. Someone told me it was dangerous...

You know in your gut if that's what you're supposed to do.

Go with your gut!

Oct 05, 2012
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UXO Tech Schools
by: Anonymous

Yes, it is flooded.

With the number of new Tech 1's hitting the grids, most I do not care to work with. Many come from previous backgrounds that have no relation to the UXO field. And it shows.

This is a line of work that punishes you or the people next to you for a bad mistake. Hence the reason that many companies and SUXOS will only take Techs 1's with references, referrals and previous experience. I don't blame them.

So yes, if you have proven yourself to not be a wing-nut, you will work. The unknown quality is where the fear lies. Most of the Tech 1's are not capable, IQ or fitness wise enough to operate a shovel. Sorry, but that is as plain I can be.

If you sat through a certain school's Tech I class, you would understand why I say that. It is the truth. Many of these young guys and girls cannot grasp or comprehend what they are doing.

Yes, some of these schools are diploma mills for the most part and you have to be really bad to be removed from the program. After all, the proof of my statement is they are for profit schools.

Oct 06, 2012
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UXO Techs In A Flooded Market
by: Steve Cassidy

I try not to publish negative posts when the author is anonymous but I made an exception in this case because some of the points are worth expounding on.

I'm still not sure it's flooded. All of my friends, including guys I've worked with in the past are working.

In the previous comment, the author says he doesn't like working with the new Techs. I believe that's a bit arrogant due to the fact that at one time, he was that new guy that no one wanted to work with.

It's not where you start, it's where you finish. I suggest working with the new Techs to ensure they're brought up correctly. Try to be a mentor instead of a grumpy old ass. Maybe you'll like it and it gives back to the community in a positive way.

I just finished a contract as SUXOS. Had a Rock Star team so my job was easy. It's true though. SUXOS and PM's talk to those hiring.

If you're looking at schools, go to TEEX or you'll have a very difficult time getting in the business.

If you're not fit, get to the gym. UXO is physically demanding. I suggest Crossfit.

If you haven't done anything exceptional, don't wait to get through UXO school to start. Start now! Not later today or Monday. Right now!

Finally, and the reason I was prompted to write this post, is that yes, the schools are for profit.

There is nothing wrong with profit as long as it's legal and ethical. Schools cannot determine the contract status of the US Corps of Engineers or the Navy. What happens if a bunch of contracts are let and there aren't enough Techs?

What if you could actually go to college and get a job based on the degree you spent $200,000 and 4-5 years getting?

This is the United States of America. We are a Capital-based country. If you're knocking profit, move to the former Soviet-based countries. But then they don't want you either because they're capital based now.

The UXO company you work for makes a profit on you. The university (Diploma Mill One and All) don't care if you pass, fail or get a job. They want your money.

Worst part is they don't teach you anything than how to be a good employee. Yes, I went to college. Tennessee Tech, which is one of the hardest academic schools in the South East.

Make a commitment to excellence and go to TEEX UXO School. Stay for a few years until you find your passion.

Dec 08, 2012
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Work not talk
by: Smiley

Tech I's are a dime a dozen. How can they be treated the same as an EOD TECH. EOD is a demanding school. Tech I's are supposed to be our peers when they arrive on the grid. Not happening. I disagree with prior posts.

Anyone can run a shovel. Learn ordnance. Tech I school may provide a foundation but its just that. A beginning. Continue learning. Ask questions. Shut up and listen.

A good reliable ordnance savvy tech I won't be for long. He/she will be a tech II then we get to another problem. Should TECH I's be allowed to Safety/QC SUXOS or any other MGT TM position?

Anyhow I digress. Parents back in the day said children should be seen and not heard. Tech I's should be the same. Unless there is a question about safety, procedures, or ordnance.

Jan 18, 2013
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My 2 cents on UXO
by: Keith Murrill

I'm not a UXO Tech or an IED expert or former military. What I am is a 44 year old who has had 30 years experience in the work force (not counting college, but I worked most of my time there too - lol).

I am currently a building inspector and due to the paltry market I've dealt with I am considering going to school (TEEX) to become a UXO Tech I. So what I have to add to this thread is this.

All the points brought up here are relevant to any field.

I can relate to most of the comments, even the danger a clumsy Tech I can pose to his colleagues. (I did commercial electrical work for 3 years and if you've ever worked eyebrow close to a live 440V panel getting hit with that is likely not much different than being blown to s**t by unexploded ordinance - ergo - you want competent people working around you).

In any field, if you are the new kid on the block, whether you're 14 or 54 you had better have enough humility to know when to shut up and listen. That would be most of the time.

The thing is this - like Steve said - everybody is the new guy at least once. Your attitude and respect for those above you and willingness to take your lumps is what determines whether you will be the new guy for 1 year or 5 years.

It also behooves the veterans to train the newbies, especially the ones that want to learn. If you don't train them, but treat them like shi** because you yourself have a crap attitude...well that's on you.

Oct 01, 2013
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Tech I's
by: JARHEADEOD

Properly trained Tech I's are an asset on the jobsite. Many EOD Techs leaving the military do not want to put their heads down, shut their mouths and dig. I do not care how many IED's you RSP'ed. Dig. I do not care how you did it in the "old Corps" Dig. I do not care that you did not use 385-1-97 in the Air Force. Dig Safely. A UXO schooled tech III who has been in the grid for 15 years is much better qualified for UXO management positions than an EOD tech retiring from the military with zero UXO experience. All of you whiney, prima dona EOD techs in the grid quit B****ing about Tech I's, train them, set the example, and lead them. And by the way, dig.

Feb 06, 2015
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work half the year
by: Anonymous

I graduated from TEEX over 3 years ago and a class of 14 only had about 4 or 5 students ever find work. Competition has only grown more fierce since then and you need multiple contacts and still most winters you will be off for about 4 months with additional downtime during the working season. Too many jack asses and stress finding the next contract to make it worth while.

Mar 04, 2015
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UXO Work Half the Year
by: Steve Cassidy

Glass half empty or half full.

No universities are guaranteeing job placement with most finding work outside their chosen field.

If you're working 6 months a year in UXO, you're still making more money than most others.

Why not work the 6 months in UXO, save your money and then pursue what's really important to you in the other 6 months?

I don't think anyone would admit to having UXO be their pinnacle of employment. Learn a new skill that isn't so physically demanding that you can do from the comfort of your home.

Cyber security, web development are great examples.

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